Pictures of the U.S.S. Washington

I created the U.S.S. Seattle blog back in 2009 as a test bed to give me a little experience before launching my Mississippi in the Confederacy blog. That blog has been up and running successfully for several years now, and I finally decided to come back and revisit the Seattle blog. I have a very large collection of real photo postcards and other artifacts related to the ship that I have put together over many  years of collecting. I want to share these photos with the public, and to start off, in this post I will share some of my pictures taken of the ship when she was still known by the name she was christened with Рthe U.S.S. Washington.

Nice colorized postcard of the U.S.S. Washington - the card was not mailed, and is not dated

Nice colorized postcard of the U.S.S. Washington – the card was not mailed, and is not dated

This is one of the few images I have found of the ship's Marine detachment. The real photo postcard is labeled "Quarter deck U.S.S. Washington," and is not dated

This is one of the few images I have found of the ship’s Marine detachment. The real photo postcard is labeled “Quarter deck U.S.S. Washington,” and is not dated

Beautiful colorized postcard of the Washington when she was part of the Great White Fleet in 1908

Beautiful colorized postcard of the Washington when she was part of the Great White Fleet in 1908

Postcard Announcing the ports of call that the Washington made during a 1910 cruise to the East Coast of the United States

Postcard Announcing the ports of call that the Washington would make during a 1910 cruise to the East Coast of the United States

In 1915 the U.S.S. Washington was sent to Haiti to deal with the civil disorder in the country. One of the places the ship landed sailors and marines was Cap Haitien. This postcard was sent by Sailor Bill Girardin to his brother Charles in Michigan and was postmarked August 10.

In 1915 the U.S.S. Washington was sent to Haiti to deal with the civil disorder in the country. One of the places the ship landed sailors and marines was Cap Haitien. This postcard was sent by Sailor Bill Girardin to his brother Charles in Michigan and was postmarked August 10.

Opposite side of the previous postcard

Opposite side of the previous postcard

This photo is part of a collection of images that belonged to George C. Jones, an electrician on board the Washington. It dates from about 1910.

This photo is part of a collection of images that belonged to George C. Jones, an electrician on board the Washington. It dates from 1911.

Caption written on the back of the previous photograph

Caption written on the back of the previous photograph

Photo from the Jones Collection of the mast of the Washington

Photo from the Jones Collection of the mast of the Washington

Another photo from the Jones Collection showing the ship's anchors and one the turrets

Another photo from the Jones Collection showing the ship’s anchors and one the turrets

Photo from the Jones Collection showing the extremely dirty business of coaling the ship

Photo from the Jones Collection showing the extremely dirty business of coaling the ship

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Jones Collection photo showing what are probably the ship's cooks, given the number of meat cleavers being brandished

Jones Collection photo showing what are probably the ship’s cooks, given the number of meat cleavers and frying pans being brandished

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This is my grandfather, Lynnly C. Adams of Brandon, Mississippi. He had his picture made in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, shortly before he was assigned to the U.S.S. Seattle. At the time this was taken, he was a 22-year-old seaman recruit.

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Welcome to the U.S.S. Seattle Blog!

This blog is dedicated to all the men who served aboard the U.S.S. Seattle (AC-11), an armored cruiser that served in the United States Fleet from 1905 – 1946. The Seattle had a very interesting history during her long life, and this blog is my humble attempt to share some of that history with the world. My interest in the Seattle is very personal: my grandfather, Lynnly C. Adams, served on the Seattle from 1917 – 1919 during World War I. I never knew my grandfather as he died a full decade before I was born, but for the past 10 years I have collected photos and artifacts related to the U.S.S. Seattle as a way of honoring his memory. This has been a labor of love, and I hope you enjoy it.

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